Posts in Instructional Coaching
Third Space Guest Post with TeachBoost.com

Last week, I invited readers who are considering whether or not to write a blog to reach out as a potential guest blogger with The Ed Narrative. I was inspired by having been asked by TeachBoost.com to guest blog with them. The process was a great experience, and at this time last week, my post had yet to officially come out. Well, it went live on Dec. 11th, and I wanted to provide a link, so that it would also be available here.

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Your Invitation to be a Guest Blogger for TheEdNarrative.com

For those of you who have a blog, or are thinking of some compelling idea, but aren’t sure if you want a full-on blog yet, this is for you. I haven’t landed on solid guidelines as of yet, as this is a new venture for me. However, if you write (or want to) about education, leadership, instructional coaching, curriculum development, professional development, or perhaps something that I haven’t mentioned, visit my Contact page and leave me a note about your idea. I’m looking forward to hearing from you!

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What You Say vs. What They Hear: The Importance of Clarity in Coaching

One should be aware of the distinction required in terms one uses in their profession.  As a coach, I’ve often wondered about some of the terms I’ve heard for the pairing of a coach and teacher.  For example, some models refer to the teacher as a “client.”  This seems an odd choice if no money exchanges hands.  It also implies that this is a transactional relationship that is predicated upon delivery of a concrete product. 

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The Benefit of Rehearsal

That was when I learned to deliberately script some responses or interactions I could anticipate.  Obviously, I’d developed go-to responses when a parent or student came to me with garden-variety issues.  Those were essentially scripted too, but through an evolutionary process.  The experience with the phone call list brought me to try it in other situations.  I have carried this over to my coaching work, especially that with novice teachers fresh from Ed School.

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Open Question--How to Quantify the Efficacy of a Coach?

Interpreting data from Education studies can often be a test of faith more than anything.  There are a lot of studies that conflate causation with correlation.  To clarify what causation and correlation are, here’s a classic example: when ice cream sales increase, so does the murder rate.  When one reads this, it seems that increased ice cream sales cause an increase in murder….

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Assuming the Positive: Things to Consider About the Norming Process

I think what stymied my connection to the norming process was that I’d seen and experienced it done haphazardly. So, my view, initially, was that this was a lot of pageantry to make a group leader feel effective. I know why, now that I’m on the other end of things, these sessions didn’t work. They were one and done, poster on the wall, and then they were never spoken of again.

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The Importance of Having a Coaching Model

—Overall the goal is to provide some sort of “moral” compass for the work.  We make so many decisions everyday, that to provide the team members with some general concepts to base the rightness of their decisions simplifies the daily workload.  It also gives us a clear-cut response when our work is questioned or we are asked to do something that does not fit our mission…

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Coaching--A Difference Between Life and Death?

Dr. Atul Gawande has been very vocal about the need for professionals to use coaches in their drive toward improvement.  When we consider the very real need for strong skills in the field for doctors, it seems like there is really no reason we should not support this.  Does the same apply to educators?  Is it life and death for us?  This post explores some of those thoughts at a prime time in the year for a teacher to sign on with a coach.

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Some Thoughts on Beginning CRT Work

CRT is not a boxed program, or a couple strategies to streamline a unit, it is harder to teach it.  And, as most people are aware, we are living in a time in which some of the socio-economic and racial biases in this country have been opened up and are raw to the touch.  Teaching this approach would have been a difficult process even without the current moment exacerbating things, but here we are and we must take the situation as it is, and not (unfortunately) as we’d prefer it to be.

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The Utility of a Third Space During Difficult Conversations

If there is progress in a teacher's work as a result of an approach like this, it builds the teacher's capacity, and it creates trust in the work the coach and the teacher are doing together, so that there may be even deeper dives into difficult work in the future as the teacher embarks on their own improvement.

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What I Do When I'm Preparing for a Podcast

Elena Aguilar’s book is intended to accompany a year-long process, and the work begins (ideally) in June.  So, I'll be releasing this episode June 15th. I look at these podcasts as an opportunity to have a long-form discussion over an idea, a chance to dive deeper.  Providing a synopsis, or an overview of a book or concept is helpful when it comes to determining whether you want to buy, or read it, but my preference is to approach these podcasts from the perspective that people have read the book, or are reading the book, and they want to fine-tune their understanding. 

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Coaching--a Difference Between Life and Death?

Dr. Atul Gawande has been very vocal about the need for professionals to use coaches in their drive toward improvement.  When we consider the very real need for strong skills in the field for doctors, it seems like there is really no reason we should not support this.  Does the same apply to educators?  Is it life and death for us?  This post explores some of those thoughts.

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Doing Half of the Work: A Meditation

We often guide students to answer questions, but perhaps the other half of the work is to question the answers.  It is the work of a scientific mind as well as that of the philosopher.  Do we often only ask students to do half of the work?  This is a brief meditation on learning.

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Rogers' Diffusion of Innovation and How it Can Apply to Change in Schools

Using Rogers' Diffusion of Innovation as an educator seeking change?  It works, and is a good way to conceptualize the process by which professional development and new approaches can proliferate in an organic fashion. 

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